Drowning in a Sea of Love
7

  • Nathan Fake
  • Border Community
  • 2006-03-20

Nathan Fake caught the spotlight when he released Outhouse in 2003 which pummelled dancefloors with a pumping techno beat over a more progressive sound. The result was instant recognition and he has gone on to produce equally excellent tracks that many a DJ would welcome into their set with open arms. Bearing that in mind, it may come as a surprise that Fake has resisted any temptation there may have been to include any of his club-friendly tunes on his debut artist album, in favour of a more blissed out journey into what is often described as IDM (Intelligent Dance Music). While I for one do not like the term, it perhaps best describes an album that is electronic music that gets the mind dancing rather than the feet.

…the whole album probably would not work without the artist’s expert ear

Opener “Stops” is a delightfully sunny track combining soothing synths with the sound of breathing and heartbeats which may seem like an impossible mix on paper, but Fake pulls it off. In fact the whole album probably would not work without the artist’s expert ear. The majority of the tracks are slow-burners that on first listen may prove to be unengaging. Stay with them, however, and you will soon find the various elements take you on different routes through the songs to many an epic soundscape at the end. This is certainly the case for “Grandfathered” and “You Are Here” — both bubbling away before bursting into a rousing climax to get you setting up in your chair with a smile on your face, nodding in time.

…Fake returns to the complex and beautifully haunting stand out track “The Sky Was Pink”

Fake has not forgot about his frenetic dance past — the sole injection of pace comes in the form of “Superpositions”, which would not be out of place on an instrumental band’s album as guitars and drums unite with electronic beats. It makes for a welcoming break before Fake returns to the complex and beautifully haunting stand out track “The Sky Was Pink” which was remixed by Border Community guru James Holden into a techno tune last year.

This debut album does suffer from a lack of flow, however, with the sub-two minute tracks sounding more like unfinished filler material rather than worthy additions in their own right. Indeed, Drowning in a Sea of Love clocks in at a meagre forty-two minutes so it feels like Fake is holding a lot of material back, but if it is his more danceable forays then perhaps they would be out of place here. Overall, Fake has proved once again he is an impressive emerging talent in the sometimes stale field of electronica.

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