How Could I Complain? EP
9

  • Pete Lawrie
  • Island
  • 2009-03-29

Born in Liverpool before his musician father’s career took the family to London, Pete Lawrie didn’t find his own musical connection till the family resettled in Wales. A need to express himself prompted a move into songwriting, which has developed into many songs being written in bedrooms and often recorded in the same place. Unable to find his own voice, or a voice he was happy with, Lawrie persisted. The hard work paid off as he has managed to move from bedroom studios to real studios with real people. Now surrounded by a band, who double up as close friends, Lawrie asks matter of factly How Could I Complain?

Lawrie’s husky vocal is endearingly honest.

A four track introduction to Lawrie’s simple self expression, How Could I Complain? is for anyone struggling to find their own identity. Full of unanswerable questions, Lawrie’s husky vocal is endearingly honest. Lyrically he verges on the obvious, which the title track demandingly innocent. Yet the sincerity with which he delivers his musings is blisteringly beautiful.
In just four songs, Lawrie proves himself to be a versatile, talented songwriter. Able to reflect his trying emotions in his musical styling, How Could I Complain? moves seamlessly between the angst-ridden “Panic” and dreamy “Paperthin”. Though title track “How Could I Complain?” sees Lawrie at his most radio friendly, he peaks at his most tender. “Jimmy And The Birds On Fire” is delicately constructed to ensure the hairs on the back of your neck will stand up. A hesitant Lawrie seems reluctant in his delivery, almost afraid of his own honesty. An intense outpouring to a lost friend, Lawrie leaves a tear welling as the song draws to a close.

Singer/songwriters are currently ten-a-penny, but in amongst the rubble there is always a gemstone to be found. Pete Lawrie may just prove himself to be that gemstone. How Could I Complain? is only a brief introduction, but Lawrie’s compelling complexities make a fleeting moment last.

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