Attack Of The Pitching Machine
7

  • cats: for peru
  • Thee SPC
  • 2009-12-07

The problem with a style of music becoming popular, is that the market gets saturated by hundreds of aspiring musicians fitting the mould. The indie/Britpop scene has since the 90s grown in popularity, to the point that British bands seem to be unable to do anything knew. Occasionally an act like the Arctic Monkeys will arrive on the scene to shake it all up a bit, but then everything returns to normal. Hailing from Dronfield (near Sheffield), cast: for peru are hoping that they fall into the same brackets as their city-mates. Offering a mix of prog, post-rock and independent pop on debut album Attack Of The Pitching Machine, they position themselves precariously in an already saturated market.

Fronted by the large lunged Adam Follett, cats: for peru are an interesting proposition. Named after an odd tale from Parkgate, Northern Ireland where rumour spread of a strange and elusive South American catching cats to take back to his native Peru, cats: for peru present relaxed indie fare of occasionally epic proportions. Based mainly in Elbow territory, it would be of little surprise if cats: for peru’s career trajectory were to emulate that of Guy Garvey and his cronies, with Attack Of The Pitching Machine lacking the instaneity of Alex Turner and chums.

Based mainly in Elbow territory, it would be of little surprise if cats: for peru’s career trajectory were to emulate that of Guy Garvey and his cronies.

That is by no means deriding what cats: for peru offer. Though not a fully original package, they rarely put a foot wrong on the 10-tracked debut. Fair enough the interestingly titled “I Love You More Than Evolution” is just a mellowed “Monster” (The Automatic), whilst “Feet First” builds with no apparent destination, but 8 out of 10 is not bad. Especially if those 8 include the stomper “Slight To The Right” and exploding stadium filler “Cutting The Bridges In Half”.

Echoes of early Stereophonics can be heard of the chillblane inducing ballad “Asleep In Monaco”. Whilst Follett lacks the gravelly tones of Welsh crooner Kelly Jones, the Yorkshireman’s groans get straight to the point. Slow burners see cats: for peru really come into their own, with the anthem “The Bearded One” and the stirring yet unresolved “Answers” completing the trio of album highlights.

cats: for peru may not have struck gold on the inspirational, genre breaking front but what they do offer is a competent, rounded debut which rarely slips up. Follett brings to the mix a distinctly memorable vocal that could see cats: for peru in for the long-haul. Attack Of The Pitching Machine may not be the record to break the Dronfield quintet, but it is an intriguing introduction.

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