Street Art at the Flying Eye Ball Pop Up Shop

Contemporary street art has popped in Mayfair for the weekend as part of an exhibition aimed at displaying and selling some of the hottest works by the best artists producing cutting edge work today. The first Flying Eyeball production is an urban visual feast at 27 Cork Street in London until Sunday (December 12th) and with work from Shoe, Inkie, Eine, Mysterious Al, Sickboy, Insa, Zeus, Hush, Mau Mau, Kid Acne, Steff Plaetz, Chu, Shok 1, RYCA, it’s a must-see with the option to buy your favourite.

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Flying Eye Ball Pop Up Shop and Exhibition in London's Mayfair

Inkie, the king pin of the UK graffiti scene for the last 25 years, is putting on a special show this Christmas featuring original art works, canvases, prints, toys, sculptures, T-shirts and books from Europe’s finest artists. The Flying Eye Pop Up Shop is coming to Cork Street in Mayfair, London next week for you to pick up an impressive festive present or two.

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Codswallop, Crumpet and Caper
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  • Edward Allhusen
  • Old House Books
  • 2009

Dr Johnson published his first dictionary in 1746. That book detailed just over 40,000 words that were used in the English language. However, language doesn’t stay till. As time passes, language changes. A new word is invented, others are begged and borrowed from other languages. This is immediately evident when looking at a modern dictionary and discovering that there are over 600,000 words used in the English language nowadays. Edward Allhusen’s Codswallop, Crumpet and Caper takes a look at over 1300 English words in common use today and explains how they came to be added to the 40,000 words used back in 1746.

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Jon McGovern wins Young Landscape Photographer of the Year Award

The Take a view Landscape Photographer of the Year Award has quickly become one of Great Britain’s most prestigious annual photographic awards. The award is the brainchild of celebrated landscape photographer Charlie Waite, who hoped for a competition that would be “an on-going platform for capturing images that best symbolise our land and our times, and that will stand as a record of our country.” The main award (and £10,000 prize money) was awarded to Parisian born Emmanuel Coupe for capturing The Old Man Of Storr, Isle of Skye.

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The Art of The Big Chill 2009

Art plays a major role at The Big Chill, especially as it is the only festival of the summer to offer a specially curated programme every year. For 2009, sculptors Henry Krokatsis and Claire Morgan, photographer Rankin, and a Jean Luc Godard-inspired charity initiative called Blank Canvas took centre stage.

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Nikki Navigates Human Machines

Nicole Sclair has always been encouraged by her family to pursue her natural artistic flair. Her father Irv recognised her ability at a young age. Having dabbled himself in the arts world, as an actor, he wanted to ensure his daughter had the best of chances. Extra-Curricular art classes followed, where Nicole thrived. At school she was clearly aligned with art set. In a typical High School, social groups had hang out zones. It was here that Nicole first became Nikki. Nikki was never happier than in the studio, where her and her friends experimented with as many different mediums as possible. Post High School, Nicole won a place at New York’s prestigious Fashion Institute of Technology, where she graduated from with a degree in Fine Arts. Following graduation, Nicole’s work has been exhibited all over the place from 220 Gallery to Temple Beth-El and Hofstra to name but a few. This September, Wantagh’s The Cup plays host to her solo exhibition Untitled. zap! bang! took a moment to talk to Nicole about her forthcoming exhibition.

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Levi Miller

  • 2009-07-19

Levi Miller and I first crossed paths when I was acting in the film Perspectives in 2006. Back then Miller was still known as Richie Mullen. I recall him to be young and enthusiastic (not that he is old and jaded now, far from it in fact!). Not long after we met, Miller was shortlisted for the Young Tate award. Our paths crossed again at the start of 2008. Having both relocated to London, the modern phenomenon of Facebook allowed us to reconnect. Miller had changed priorities, though still working in film and television as a day job, he was now pursuing his passion for photography.

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The Last Mad Surge Of Youth
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  • Mark Hodkinson
  • Pomona
  • 2009

“He was going to be one of the select few — The Rolling Stones, U2, Bob Dylan, REM, David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen — artists who remained credible but still had commercial success and who’s every album felt interwoven with itself, a cultural landmark.” It’s 2009 and John Barrett, former Killing Stars frontman is a has-been. In his heart he knows this, but he still has loyal fans so even if his latest album Godspace has sold a handful of copies, both his agent, Rupert Green and his second wife Esther are not even sure if he is worth it anymore. Where had it all gone wrong? What had happened to the ambitious punk wannabe who had been so full of integrity? How did he end up here?

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Underdrome
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  • Camden, London
  • United Kingdom
  • 2009-05-14

Choreographer, performer and sound/video artist Darren Johnston’s debut production as artist-in-residence at The Roundhouse promised a hybrid event featuring dance, music and visual arts. A collaboration including London Contemporary Orchestra and ambient hardcore musician Zan Lyons held so much promise on paper with its dark and brooding invite to enter whatever the “Underdrome” was, yet expectations were barely met as reality dawned on a fatally flawed 90 minutes.

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The Wilderness
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  • Samantha Harvey
  • Jonathan Cape
  • 2009

Initially, Samantha Harvey’s debut novel The Wilderness is a confusing affair. Jake is 65, he has lost his wife and is starting to lose his mind. The latter being something his then alive wife has noted. Jake’s life has never been straight forward, therefore losing control of it is even less so. Jake has Alzheimer’s. This revelation appears early enough in the book to allow the reader time to digest what has gone before. That being a twisting a turning series of events, which without explanation would make no sense.

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A Nasty Piece of Work
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  • Graham Bendel
  • Fortune Teller Press
  • 2008

Modern art is questioned, assessed and given a brutal analysis in A Nasty Piece of Work which sees literary agent Jonathan Urich handed the opportunity of a lifetime to repair his rapidly deteriorating reputation and become rich at the same time. It’s the setting for a dip into the mind of a seedy man who fantasises about a work colleague he’ll never be close to while frantically crying out for a hit novel to help realise his dreams. This mystery thriller tosses morals aside as the art world does, as the title suggests, get nasty.

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The Ladies of Grace Adieu
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  • Susanna Clarke
  • Bloomsbury USA
  • 2006

The Ladies of Grace Adieu is the second book of Clarke’s saga, a moment for the writer to catch her breath before another big effort: eight short stories that give readers more information about the state of magic before Norrell and Strange and introduce yet more characters who will surely come back in future works, such as the half-faerie Alessandro Simonelli, who narrates “Mr Simonelli or The Faerie Widower”, and adventure buddies David Montefiore, a Jewish physician, and Tom Brightwind, a Faerie prince — as well as Brightwind’s bastard son, Lucius Winstanley, who conveniently disappears on a horse at the end of “Tom Brightwind or How the Fairy Bridge Was Built at Thoresby”.

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Tim Hawkinson: Zoopsia
4

  • Los Angeles
  • United States
  • 2007-05-07

Zoopsia, a visual hallucination of animals, is often something attributed to the fantasy of a child. With this in mind, you’ll find little shock in the form of the work Hawkinson is exhibiting at the Getty Center. It’s slightly humorous, but more silly, and for the most part it’s simple. However, this isn’t to say that the work is all out poor.

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1982, Janine
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  • Alasdair Gray
  • Canongate
  • 1984

1982, Janine is deceivingly modest: in a cheap hotel room somewhere in Scotland a middle-aged everyman drinks his minibar dry and tries to escape his thoughts and memories through wicked fantasies of bondage and domination. But one human mind can be more complex and fascinating than a whole world — than two worlds, even — and 1982, Janine is good evidence for it.

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You Don't Love Me Yet
6

  • Jonathan Lethem
  • Doubleday
  • 2007

Jonathan Lethem. He’s got everything right: the words, the rhythm, even that most elusive of substances, the humor. He doesn’t make it easy for the reader, doesn’t dumb his work down, and yet following his prose is so easy and pleasurable it often feels I could keep doing it forever. He is inventive without being showy, avoiding cliches as if they simply weren’t there.

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Travels in the Scriptorium
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  • Paul Auster
  • Henry Holt
  • 2007

“Paul Auster is getting old”, my wife wrote on the first page of Travels in the Scriptorium. She’s right, as always; I’d only add he’s also really scared of it. Mr. Blank, Travels’ protagonist, has trouble walking and bending down, shakes so much he can’t feed himself, pees his pants. Add to these problems the facts that they are not attributed to old age alone — the shaking is a side effect of Mr. Blank’s medication, the urinary incident comes about from muscle relaxation due to a fall — and that Blank is clearly a fictional Auster, and the author’s feelings about getting old become more pungent still.

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Death's Dark Abyss
8

  • Massimo Carlotto
  • Europa Editions
  • 2004

In a post about a subject entirely alien to this review (if you must know, a critique of an article about Orthodox Jewish-American fiction written by Wendy Shalit for the New York Times Book Review), Ron Hogan passingly describes noir as “a genre in which idealism is often defined by its absence”. If we take this definition as standard, I think Death’s Dark Abyss by Italian author Massimo Carlotto is the noirest thing I’ve ever read.

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Burton on Burton
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  • Mark Salisbury
  • Faber and Faber
  • 1995

Labels such as a love of the gothic, odd imaginings and a strange sense of humour have followed Tim Burton throughout his career. His drak take on Batman, the quirky death comedy Beetlejuice and a twisted version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005) might leave the impression of a man who had a troubled childhood. Burton on Burton reveals that he simply sees life from a different perspective that may be not be not suit all tastes, but he does reveal many of life’s truths through his unique cinematic visions in this updated edition that takes us up to 2005’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Corpse Bridge.

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Momentary Momentum: Animated Drawings
8

  • London
  • United Kingdom
  • 2007-03-24

Animation exhibition Momentary Momentum seeks to show how dramatic changes between the past and present resonate equally. The once simple, naive and exalting emotions portrayed in folk tales have given way to animated versions of contemporary life that evoke the same, and often quaint, acts of living.

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Little Cakes Flip Book Show
7

  • Brooklyn
  • United States
  • 2007-01-18

Secret Project Robot is a three-floor gallery space a block from the east river. The emphasis behind Secret Project Robot is community, whether it is the artists or the exhibit itself, the building as a whole is meant to be a work of art. However, for all of its spirit, SPR properly demonstrates that function still reigns over form.

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Art@Agnes
8

  • Tokyo
  • Japan
  • 2007-01-14

Imagine a sparse white room and in your mind fill it with art objects. Next replace the white room with an empty hotel room and multiply this by 39. Voila, you have Art@Agnes.

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Seripop / Rob Churm
7

  • London
  • United Kingdom
  • 2007-01-16

Artist duo Seripop and Rob Churm both produce music in the underground music scenes of harsh noise rock and punkish improv, but they also produce drawings and screenprinted posters to promote the music of their projects and that of others. This exhibition brings together their rich history of graphic imagery, poster art, graffitismo and the wild subconscious to a sometimes visionary, other times traumatic, effect.

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